11 Lessons Learned from Failed Link Building Campaigns

Posted by kerryjones

We’ve created more than 800 content campaigns at Fractl over the years, and we’d be lying if we told you every single one was a hit.

The Internet is a finicky place. You can’t predict with 100% accuracy if your content will perform well. Sometimes what we think is going to do OK ends up being a massive hit. And there have been a few instances where we’d expect a campaign to be a huge success but it went on to garner lackluster results.

While you can’t control the whims of the Internet, you can avoid or include certain things in your content to help your chances of success. Through careful analysis we’ve pinpointed which factors tend to create high-performing content. Similarly, we’ve identified trends among our content that didn’t quite hit the mark.

soup-nazi.gif

In this this post, I’ll share our most valuable lessons we learned from content flops. Bear in mind this advice applies if you’re using content to earn links and press pickups, which is what the majority of the content we create at Fractl aims to do.

1. There’s such a thing as too much data.

For content involving a lot of data, it can be tempting to publish every single data point you collect.

A good example of this is surveying. We’ve fallen down the rabbit hole of not only sharing all of the data we’ve collected in a survey, but also segmenting the data out by demographics — regardless of whether or not all of that data is super compelling. While this can give publishers a large volume of potential angles to choose from, the result is often unfocused content lacking a cohesive narrative.

george-and-jerry.gif

Only include the most insightful, interesting data points in your content, even if that means tossing aside most of the data you’ve gathered.

One example of this was a survey we did for a home security client where we asked people about stalker-ish behaviors they’d committed. The juiciest survey data (like 1 in 5 respondents had created a fake social account to spy on someone — yikes!) ended up getting buried because we included every data point from the survey, some of which wasn’t so interesting. Had we trimmed down the content to only the most shocking findings, it probably would have performed far better.

Furthermore, the more data you include, the more time it takes for a publisher to wade through it. As one journalist told us after we sent over an epic amount of data: “Long story short, this will take too much time.”

Consider this: It shouldn’t take a publisher more than 10 seconds of looking at your project to grasp the most meaningful data points. If they can’t quickly understand that, how will their readers?

2. Turning published data into something cool doesn’t always yield links.

If you’re going to use data that’s already been reported on, you better have a new spin or finding to present. Journalists don’t want to cover the same stats they have already covered.

A great example of this is a project we created about the reasons startups fail. The majority of the data we used came from CB Insights’ startup post mortems list, which had performed really well for them. (As of the time I’m writing this, according to Open Site Explorer it has 197 linking root domains from sites including BBC, Business Insider, Fortune, Vox, CNBC, and Entrepreneur — impressive!)

It worked well once, so it should work again if we repackage it into a new format, right?

We used the startups featured on the CB Insights list, added in a handful of additional startups, and created a sexy-looking interactive node map that grouped together startups according to the primary reasons they went under.

While the content didn’t end up being a failure (we got it picked up by Quartz, woo!), it definitely didn’t live up to the expectations we had for it.

Two problems with this project:

  1. We weren’t saying anything new about the data.
  2. The original data had gotten so much coverage that many relevant publishers had already seen it and/or published it.

But of course, there are exceptions. If you’re using existing data that hasn’t gotten a ton of coverage, but is interesting, then this can be a smart approach. The key is avoiding data that has already been widely reported in the vertical you want to get coverage in.

3. It’s difficult to build links with videos.

Video content can be extremely effective for viral sharing, which is fantastic for brand awareness. But are videos great for earning links? Not so much.

When you think of viral content, videos probably come to mind — which is exactly why you may assume awesome videos can attract a ton of backlinks. The problem is, publishers rarely give proper attribution to videos. Instead of linking to the video’s creator, they just embed the video from YouTube or link to YouTube. While a mention/link to the content creator often happens organically with a piece of static visual content, this is often not the case with videos.

Of course, you can reach out to anyone who embeds your video without linking to you and ask for a link. But this can add a time-consuming extra step to the already time-intensive process of video creation and promotion.

4. Political ideas are tough to pull off.

Most brands don’t want to touch political topics with a ten-foot pole. But to others, creating political content is appealing since it has strong potential to evoke an emotional reaction and get a lot of attention.

kramer-jerry.gif

We’ve had several amazing political ideas fail despite solid executions and promotional efforts. It’s hard for us to say why this is, but our assumption has been publishers don’t care about political content that isn’t breaking (because it’s always breaking). For this reason, we believe it’s nearly impossible to compete with the constant cycle of breaking political news.

5. Don’t make content for a specific publisher.

We’ve reached out to publishers to collaborate during content production, assuming that if the publisher feels ownership over the content and it’s created to their specifications, they will definitely publish it.

In general, we’ve found this approach doesn’t work because it tends to be a drain on the publishers (they don’t want to take on the extra work of collaborating with you) and it locks you into an end result that may only work for their site and no other publishers.

Remember: Publishers care about getting views and engagement on their site, not link generation for you or your client.

6. Hyperlocal content is a big risk.

If you focus on one city, even with an amazing piece of content featuring newsworthy information, you’re limited in how many publishers you can pitch it to. And then, you’re out of luck if none of those local publishers pick it up.

On the flip side, we’ve had a lot of success with content that features multiple cities/states/regions. This allows us to target a range of local and national publishers.

Note: This advice applies to campaigns where links/press mentions are the main goal – I’m not saying to never create content for a certain locality.

7. Always make more than one visual asset.

And one of those assets should always be a simple, static image.

Why?

Many websites have limits to the type of media they can publish. Every publisher is able to publish a static graphic, but not everyone can embed more complex content formats (fortunately, Moz can handle GIFs).

george-and-kramer.gif

In most cases, we’ve found publishers prefer the simplest visualizations. One classic example of this is a project where we compared reading levels and IQ across different states based on a analysis of half a million tweets. Our Director of Creative, Ryan Sammy, spent a painstaking amount of time (and money) creating an interactive map of the results.

What did most publishers end up featuring? A screenshot of a Tableau dashboard we had sent as a preview during outreach…

8. Be realistic about newsjacking.

Newsjacking content needs to go live within 24 to 48 hours of the news event to be timely. Can you really produce something in time to newsjack?

We’ve found newsjacking is hard to pull off in an agency setting since you have to account for production timelines and getting client feedback and approval. In-house brands have a more feasible shot at newsjacking if they don’t have to worry about a long internal approval process.

9. Watch out for shiny new tools and content formats.

Just because you are using cool, new technology doesn’t automatically make the content interesting. We’ve gotten caught up in the “cool factor” of the format or method only to end up with boring (but pretty) content.

10. Avoid super niche topics.

You greatly increase your risk of no return when you go super niche. The more you drill down a topic, the smaller your potential audience becomes (and potential sites that will link become fewer, too).

There are a ton of people interested in music, there are fewer people interested in rap music, there are even fewer people interested in folk rap music, and finally, there are so few people interested in ’90s folk rap. Creating content around ’90s folk rap will probably yield few to no links.

Some questions to ask to ensure your topic isn’t too niche:

  • Is there a large volume of published content about this topic? Do a Google search for a few niche keywords to see how many results come up compared to broader top-level topics.
  • If there is a lot of content, does that content get high engagement? Do a search in Buzzsumo for keywords related to the niche topic. Is the top content getting thousands of shares?
  • Are people curious about this topic? Search on BloomBerry to see how many questions people are asking about it.
  • Are there online communities dedicated to the topic? Do a quick search for “niche keyword + forum” to turn up communities.
  • Are there more than 5 publishers that focus exclusively on the niche topic?

11. Don’t make content on a topic you can’t be credible in.

When we produced a hard-hitting project about murder in the U.S. for a gambling client, the publishers we pitched didn’t take it seriously because the client wasn’t an authority on the subject.

From that point on, we stuck to creating more light-hearted content around gambling, partying, and entertainment, which is highly relevant to our client and goes over extremely well with publishers.

It’s OK to create content that is tangentially related to your brand (we do this very often), but the connection between the content topic and your industry should be obvious. Don’t leave publishers wondering, why is this company making this content?”

costanza.gif


Learning from failure is crucial for improvement.

Failure is inevitable, especially when you’re pushing boundaries or experimenting with something new (two things we try to do often at Fractl). The good news is that with failure you tend to have the greatest “a-ha!” moments. This is why having a post-campaign review of what did and didn’t work is so important.

Getting to the heart of why your content is rejected by publishers can be extremely helpful — we collect this information, and it’s invaluable for spotting things we can tweak during content production to increase our success rate. When a publisher tells you “no,” many times they will give a brief explanation why (and if they don’t, you can ask nicely for their feedback). Collect and review all of this publisher feedback and review it every few months. Like us, you may notice trends as to why publishers are passing up your content. Use these insights to correct your course instead of continuing to make the same mistakes.

And one last note for anyone creating content for clients: What should you do when your client’s campaign is a flop? To mitigate the risk to our clients, we replace a campaign if it fails to get any publisher coverage. While we’ve rarely had to do this, putting this assurance in place can give both you and your client peace of mind that a low-performing campaign doesn’t mean their investment has gone to waste.

What have you observed about your content that didn’t perform well? Does your experience contradict or mirror any of the lessons I shared?

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

from Moz Blog https://moz.com/blog/lessons-from-failed-link-building
via IFTTT

from Blogger http://imlocalseo.blogspot.com/2017/08/11-lessons-learned-from-failed-link.html
via IFTTT

from IM Local SEO https://imlocalseo.wordpress.com/2017/08/08/11-lessons-learned-from-failed-link-building-campaigns/
via IFTTT

from Gana Dinero Colaborando | Wecon Project https://weconprojectspain.wordpress.com/2017/08/08/11-lessons-learned-from-failed-link-building-campaigns/
via IFTTT

Overcoming Corporate Roadblocks for Enterprise SEO Efficacy

Posted by jaredgardner

“You don’t have an SEO strategy problem. You have an organizational efficacy problem.”

That is typically what I tell our new clients at Red Door Interactive (RDI). Poor organizational efficacy can be caused by several things, most commonly a lack of labor, a lack of knowledge, or a lack of senior executive buy-in and direction. Many people would say “efficiency” is a more accurate term than “efficacy,” but I like to remind people that you can do ineffective SEO in a very efficient manner. If the work doesn’t move the needle, then there’s a fatal flaw in your SEO program.

At RDI, we specialize in marketing services for mid to large enterprise clients with annual revenues of our ideal client ranging from $50M/year to $20B/year. The size of clients that we work with have 50+ person marketing departments, and some with more than 1,000. Implementing profitable and evolving SEO programs is much more difficult for non-agile companies and those with marketing that predates the internet. Despite having more resources and built-in topical authority, enterprise SEO can be much harder than SMB SEO — not only because the SEO challenges are greater, but because it introduces another layer of organizational challenges.

What is enterprise SEO?

This same question was on a slide at a recent SEO meetup lead by Ratish Naroor, Director of SEO at Overstock.com. Ratish’s opinion of what constitutes enterprise SEO differed from mine in a few areas. Ratish’s main qualification was that the site in question had one million organic landing pages. At RDI, we work with companies that drive hundreds of millions of dollars a year in revenue through organic search. Often these sites have less than 5,000 pages, yet their digital marketing departments are twice the size of many marketing teams at e-commerce-first companies. In my opinion, there’s more to consider than just the number of pages. I like to focus on the organization itself and not the size of its site; organizations whose website is its product take SEO more seriously. E-commerce retailers like Overstock, real estate sites like Zillow, and travel sites like Trip Advisor or Expedia all invest heavily in SEO programs. Many times, “old companies” that have been around 40+ years will have “old management” stakeholders who are a little late to the digital marketing party and more resistant to change. Does this late adoption of SEO and digital marketing make the organization itself any less enterprise? I don’t believe so.

If it’s not just page count that matters, where do you draw the line for “enterprise SEO”? Here’s how I classify it:

  1. Corporate team structure, budgeting, and approval process. There’s no hard number here, but typically 20 or more people are involved in taking web pages from an idea to a 200 status code. Some companies are so lean it will blow you away, so think more than just the total head count.
  2. Organic search as a channel can drive realistic business. SEO isn’t for every company, so it’s crucial that the company can drive top-line revenue growth through organic search.
  3. Unique and difficult SEO challenges. This may include large page counts where scaling on-page changes and crawl control is important, competitive industries where search terms have high paid CPAs, or international SEO operating in multiple languages and countries.

How do you succeed at enterprise SEO?

When working with an enterprise organization, there are three major areas to address in order to minimize internal SEO challenges and to see real follow-through in implementing high-value SEO ideas, strategies, and tactics.

1. Create a culture of SEO through visibility

SEO can’t succeed in a silo. To get your strategies implemented, you will need full participation and cooperation with content producers, developers, legal, and department heads. It’s important to remember that companies of this size will have an established culture. Sometimes this culture is dysfunctional, and overcoming it will be an uphill battle. Tom Critchlow recently described this culture as a “grain.” The direction and depth of this “grain” is going dictate how much time you spend on this step, and the best way to get people involved is to keep your work visible to the decision makers:

  • Automated reporting: Focus on showing each team/person metrics they can control
    • Dev teams: Technical crawl reports with issues such as internal redirects or 404 reports are relevant things that they can control. We like DeepCrawl for crawl reporting.
    • VPs and directors: High-level performance reports like M/M and Y/Y traffic and conversions give them a bird’s eye view of the site and the effects of your SEO efforts. Tying this data to a dollar figure will help make your case. This can include simple analytics data from Google Analytics, or more advanced tools such as our favorite BI tool, DOMO, or its competitor Tableau.
    • Product owners/business units: Keyword-level data and traffic to a specific site section that a team works on. An enterprise SEO tool like BrightEdge or Conductor can make these reports easy to manage.
    • Pro tip: Include the email of the SEO lead on these reports and encourage questions.
  • Trainings
    • Many marketers still think SEO is something you sprinkle on at the end of a content project, or “something our IT team handles.” It’s up to you to break down those assumptions and educate their team on the idea that that SEO is symbiotic with every marketing channel and department. These trainings can vary quite a bit, so find what works for the company you are working in/with. We have seen success with the following formats: lunch and learns, video recordings for SEO suites mentioned above, team-specific trainings focused on the area the team controls such as development or content research. While I’d love to say that we turned all the marketers into great SEOs, that’s rarely the case. What we typically see — and are thrilled when it happens — is an email from a product manager that says, “Hey, we are launching a new product next quarter and you mentioned it’s good to do keyword research for new pages; can you help?”
  • Open brainstorms
    • Share your knowledge and promote contributions to the program. When I started at RDI 2.5 years ago, our SEO program was good, but it was siloed. We had 3 people working on their own projects for clients and not really collaborating with each other. To share ideas between the (much larger) SEO team and other teams, we started hosting weekly meetings called the “SEO Brainshare.” Each week, one team member picks a topic or challenge and we workshop it with whoever wants to participate. We typically see 5–10 people from other teams at RDI join the meeting, which increases SEO knowledge and keeps our department top of mind. After a year of hosting these meetings religiously, we have seen a large influx in SEO work being incorporated into new and existing client programs, as well as a more multi-channel approach to everything we do at RDI.

2. Teamwork and navigating a political environment

As an agency, we have to be clear with our main point of contact: “You can’t change your SEO results without changing your site. We need you to be the driver of change at your organization. RDI will arm you with the ideas, rationale, and detailed instructions, but you have to get the people in your organization to act.”

While my experience is very agency-focused, in-house SEOs will have to explain a similar scenario to their managers, and the managers of the content, creative, and development teams. The best way to enable yourself for success is make sure you have access to all the players needed for SEO greatness, and they each know what’s at stake and have a certain degree of ownership from their managers. If the product owner doesn’t have a KPI tied to organic traffic or conversions on their pages, it’s highly unlikely they will prioritize and take ownership of organic traffic to those pages.

For a real-world example, I’ve presented challenges and opportunities to Senior VPs and CMOs at Fortune 100 companies where executives have said, “Wow this is a huge opportunity. Why haven’t we done this yet?” and our main client contact responds, “Because XX department hasn’t been tasked with supporting us from their management, so this isn’t their problem.” That’s where the politics really start to come in. You typically need to go high enough up the marketing department ladder to convince someone with power to back your initiative and direct people outside of your department to support you, holding those other people accountable for the results of the team.

3. Don’t get lost in the noise — focus on return

This is undoubtedly the hardest to nail. SEO results by nature are highly ambiguous. There is a constant flux of right vs wrong, causation vs correlation, and my least favorite, the best choice between two “good” options. I recently listened to a podcast where Bill Hunt (an OG of SEO, BTW) said, “If you can’t put a dollar number on it, you won’t get a dollar for it.” The hardest thing for me to do as I grew my SEO strategies from local businesses to enterprises was to eliminate SEO busy work. I needed to move away from tasks like updating ALT tags because a crawl tool flagged them as “errors,” and start focusing on projects that would have a monetary impact — like creating new site sections, reworking high-ranking titles for CTR, and consolidating competing content.

There are a few ways to estimate the impact of a fix. Most involve some form of search volume X expected CTR X conversion rate. Here’s the formula in theory:

(Expected click-through rate at current position X search volume for that term) X (conversion rate of site section) = Current non-brand conversions for a keyword

Now you need to see how many non-brand conversions you would get if you achieved the rank you feel is plausible (this is more of an art than science; I like to use the rank of the top competitor as “achievable”):

(Expected click-through rate at target position X search volume for that term) X (conversion rate of site section) = Target non-brand conversions for a keyword

Then run a percent change for delta for those two numbers and you have the amount of new conversions for your project.

Ideally you want to do this at scale, since you want to look at more than a single search term for a site change. Here is the excel formula for that:

=IFERROR(B3*(VLOOKUP(G3,’Rank CTR’!A:B,2,0)),0)

For this you’ll need to have a CTR curve table in a table labeled “Rank CTR.” We used the CTR table from AWR for unbranded search, but feel free to use any CTR curve you feel is most accurate for your industry. You can even build upon your own data in Google Search Console.

You will need to do this once for current estimated traffic and again after you have set your target rank numbers, then run a delta to get percent change. (The above formula and CTR curve can be found in the Content Gap Analysis template on our site.)

Working in the agency world, the pressure for our recommendations to have a return is extremely high because those recommendations are measured against the cost of the retainer, even when the project might be something that tends to have a negative impact, like a domain migration. At RDI, the closest thing we have to a secret sauce for this is our Content Gap Analysis. Here’s a sample of how we present findings to clients:

You can grab the Excel template from our site linked above.

They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. In the Content Gap Analysis we look at what competitors are doing, then measure the estimated traffic for a topic area. This kind of analysis looks for gaps on our client’s site where competitors have content and we do not. We can examine the likelihood of us being successful in our next content endeavor and to put a number on the estimated traffic a competitor’s site section or page is getting. Once you find opportunities with a forecastable impact, prioritize them in content or site projects and try not to juggle too many balls at once — at least until some content projects have shipped. Don’t forget to quickly communicate the success of a project to accelerate the two factors mentioned above, even if it’s just a quick email with a screenshot from Google/Adobe Analytics.

Focus on the needle-movers and communicate the value of your ideas clearly

Enterprise SEO is great because it allows you the opportunity to work on sites with serious impact and serious challenges. Sometimes you must take the good with the bad, and in enterprise SEO the bad is typically the bureaucracy that comes with large companies. Focus on what matters, don’t piss anyone off, and don’t relent on the need for progress. Happy optimizing! Please share how you have conquered organization challenges in your work in the comments below!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

from Moz Blog https://moz.com/blog/enterprise-seo-efficacy
via IFTTT

from Blogger http://imlocalseo.blogspot.com/2017/08/overcoming-corporate-roadblocks-for.html
via IFTTT

from IM Local SEO https://imlocalseo.wordpress.com/2017/08/07/overcoming-corporate-roadblocks-for-enterprise-seo-efficacy/
via IFTTT

from Gana Dinero Colaborando | Wecon Project https://weconprojectspain.wordpress.com/2017/08/07/overcoming-corporate-roadblocks-for-enterprise-seo-efficacy/
via IFTTT

https://t.co/wZbbeZYms3 áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares https://t.co/YEohnD5rPZ

https://t.co/wZbbeZYms3 áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares https://t.co/YEohnD5rPZ — Network Coaching (@thenetcoaching) August 4, 2017 //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js from Twitter https://twitter.com/thenetcoaching August 04, 2017 at 05:13PM via IFTTT from Network Coaching https://thenetworkcoaching.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/httpst-cowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-httpst-coyeohnd5rpz/ via IFTTT from Local SEO Guru http://localseoguru.tumblr.com/post/163786789763 via IFTTT
from Tumblr http://tomeucapella.tumblr.com/post/163786975105/httpstcowzbbezyms3-áticos-con-las-piscinas
via IFTTT

from Blogger http://imlocalseo.blogspot.com/2017/08/httpstcowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las_66.html
via IFTTT

from IM Local SEO https://imlocalseo.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/httpst-cowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-httpst-coyeohnd5rpz-4/
via IFTTT

from Gana Dinero Colaborando | Wecon Project https://weconprojectspain.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/httpst-cowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-httpst-coyeohnd5rpz-4/
via IFTTT

https://t.co/wZbbeZYms3 áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares https://t.co/YEohnD5rPZ

https://t.co/wZbbeZYms3 áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares https://t.co/YEohnD5rPZ — Network Coaching (@thenetcoaching) August 4, 2017 from Twitter https://twitter.com/thenetcoaching August 04, 2017 at 05:13PM via IFTTT from Network Coaching http://networkcoaching.tumblr.com/post/163786602464 via IFTTT from Local SEO Guru http://localseoguru.tumblr.com/post/163786737018 via IFTTT
from Tumblr http://tomeucapella.tumblr.com/post/163786974865/httpstcowzbbezyms3-áticos-con-las-piscinas
via IFTTT

from Blogger http://imlocalseo.blogspot.com/2017/08/httpstcowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las_89.html
via IFTTT

from IM Local SEO https://imlocalseo.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/httpst-cowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-httpst-coyeohnd5rpz-3/
via IFTTT

from Gana Dinero Colaborando | Wecon Project https://weconprojectspain.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/httpst-cowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-httpst-coyeohnd5rpz-3/
via IFTTT

5 áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares

Si eres atrevido, amante de las piscinas más exclusivas y quieres disfrutar de una gran experiencia, estos espacios en las alturas te van a conquistar Hay quienes prefieren tener una casa al lado del mar, otros que tienen una piscina privada u otros con una piscina comunitaria en su bloque de pisos. Las piscinas nos fascinan, además son el elemento arquitectónico que mejor define el lujo y el nivel económico. Pero como soñar no cuesta nada, te mostramos algunas de los áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares. Pertenecen a hoteles y tienen en común su originalidad y exclusividad. En esta selección encontramos piscinas para todos los gustos: las infinitas, en las que el agua parece extenderse hacia el horizonte; las construidas en techos o con materiales transparentes o con fondos de colores. 5 áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares Piscina del Hotel Marina Bay Sands Si en alguna ocasión pasas por Singapur, no te puedes perder la oportunidad de disfrutar de la piscina con la mejor panorámica de la ciudad. El Hotel Marina Bay Sands es un supercomplejo hotelero que consta de tres torres de 200 metros de altura. Esta piscina, más conocida como SkyPark, se encuentra en el piso 57 y tiene una superficie de más de 12.000 metros cuadrados. Es la plataforma voladiza más grande del mundo y sin duda sus vistas son impresionantes. Su borde es infinito y mide 150 metros de largo, lo que la convierte en la mayor piscina exterior construida a esas alturas. Si quieres bañarte en ella deberás alojarte en el hotel, ya que está reservada para sus huéspedes. Piscinas colgantes del Ubud Hanging Gardens Hotel En Bali (Indonesia) se encuentran las piscinas colgantes del Ubud Hanging Gardens Hotel que se caracterizan por ser tener distintos niveles y un borde infinito. Además, posee 38 villas de lujo con piscina privada que se integran en este el entorno paisajístico. Los clientes del hotel pueden nadar en la orilla y disfrutar de las vistas al antiguo templo Pura Penataran Dalem Segara, situado en la ladera opuesta. Lo que hace originales estas piscinas son sus curvas que copian la forma y la belleza de las colinas. Piscina del Hotel Holiday Inn Shanghai Pudong Kangqiao Situada en el piso 24 del hotel, la piscina de este hotel de cuatro estrellas de Shanghai está suspendida en el aire a 100 metros de altura. Lo que llama la atención de ella es su fondo, hecho de vidrio fortalecido que provoca al bañista una increíble sensación de vértigo. Uno de sus extremos se encuentra integrado en el edificio, mientras que el otro sobresale del mismo a modo de cuerno. De este modo, los miedosos también pueden darse un baño, y los valientes tienen a tocar la mayor gracia del lugar. Además, se puede disfrutar de la vista panorámica de Pudong: la piscina posee 30 metros de largo, 6 de ancho y 1,5 de profundidad. Es la primera de su tipo en China. Piscina del Hilton Hotel Auckland Muy parecida a la anterior, en hotel Hilton de Auckland en Nueva Zelanda cuanta con una piscina climatizada de forma alargada situada en la parte superior. El extremo que cuelga de la fachada del edificio tiene su pared de vidrio por lo que se pueden obtener unas maravillosas vistas. En ella, tampoco te podrás bañar si sufres vértigo ya que se encuentra suspendida en lo más alto del hotel de lujo. Piscina en el Hotel Fasano En la playa de Ipanema, en Río de Janeiro, el Hotel Fasano cuenta con una piscina en la azotea con las puestas de sol más espectaculares de la ciudad y con vistas al cerro Pan de Azúcar. Su aire sofisticado de los 50 traslada al huésped a una película de James Bond. Fue diseñada por Philippe Starck y se inspiró en el legado vanguardista de la ciudad aunque en ella se aprecia un aire retro y contemporáneo. En definitiva, si te gusta viajar, eres un aventurero y quieres vivir una experiencia única no te puedes perder estos áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares. //pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push(); Source link from Blog https://goagencies.com/5-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares/ via Go Agencies from Network Coaching https://thenetworkcoaching.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/5-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares/ via IFTTT from Local SEO Guru http://localseoguru.tumblr.com/post/163786614003 via IFTTT
from Tumblr http://tomeucapella.tumblr.com/post/163786720105/5-áticos-con-las-piscinas-más-espectaculares
via IFTTT

from Blogger http://imlocalseo.blogspot.com/2017/08/5-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas_4.html
via IFTTT

from IM Local SEO https://imlocalseo.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/5-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-2/
via IFTTT

from Gana Dinero Colaborando | Wecon Project https://weconprojectspain.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/5-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-2/
via IFTTT

https://t.co/wZbbeZYms3 áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares https://t.co/YEohnD5rPZ

https://t.co/wZbbeZYms3 áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares https://t.co/YEohnD5rPZ — Network Coaching (@thenetcoaching) August 4, 2017 //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js from Twitter https://twitter.com/thenetcoaching August 04, 2017 at 05:13PM via IFTTT from Network Coaching https://thenetworkcoaching.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/httpst-cowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-httpst-coyeohnd5rpz/ via IFTTT from Local SEO Guru http://localseoguru.tumblr.com/post/163786789763 via IFTTT
from Tumblr http://tomeucapella.tumblr.com/post/163786975105/httpstcowzbbezyms3-áticos-con-las-piscinas
via IFTTT

from Network Coaching http://thenetworkcoaching.blogspot.com/2017/08/httpstcowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las_4.html
via IFTTT

from Blogger http://imlocalseo.blogspot.com/2017/08/httpstcowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las_4.html
via IFTTT

from IM Local SEO https://imlocalseo.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/httpst-cowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-httpst-coyeohnd5rpz-2/
via IFTTT

from Gana Dinero Colaborando | Wecon Project https://weconprojectspain.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/httpst-cowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-httpst-coyeohnd5rpz-2/
via IFTTT

https://t.co/wZbbeZYms3 áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares https://t.co/YEohnD5rPZ

https://t.co/wZbbeZYms3 áticos con las piscinas más espectaculares https://t.co/YEohnD5rPZ — Network Coaching (@thenetcoaching) August 4, 2017 from Twitter https://twitter.com/thenetcoaching August 04, 2017 at 05:13PM via IFTTT from Network Coaching http://networkcoaching.tumblr.com/post/163786602464 via IFTTT from Local SEO Guru http://localseoguru.tumblr.com/post/163786737018 via IFTTT
from Tumblr http://tomeucapella.tumblr.com/post/163786974865/httpstcowzbbezyms3-áticos-con-las-piscinas
via IFTTT

from Network Coaching http://thenetworkcoaching.blogspot.com/2017/08/httpstcowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las.html
via IFTTT

from Blogger http://imlocalseo.blogspot.com/2017/08/httpstcowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las.html
via IFTTT

from IM Local SEO https://imlocalseo.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/httpst-cowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-httpst-coyeohnd5rpz/
via IFTTT

from Gana Dinero Colaborando | Wecon Project https://weconprojectspain.wordpress.com/2017/08/04/httpst-cowzbbezyms3-aticos-con-las-piscinas-mas-espectaculares-httpst-coyeohnd5rpz/
via IFTTT